In Photos: Whitley Awards for Nature Conservation 2018 Winners

Picturing Whitley awards for nature conservation 2018 winners. Six conservationists have been recognized for their work with local communities to protect threatened wildlife and habitat around the world. The prestigious awards, known as the ‘green Oscars’, are made annually by the Whitley Fund for Nature.

Check them out for more information and start to see our world through photos!

Pablo Garcia Borboroglu, an Argentinian marine biologist spearheading a global campaign to protect penguins, was honored with the gold award for his outstanding contribution to nature conservation.
Photograph: 2018 Whitley Award

More than half of the world’s 18 species of penguin are threatened with extinction, but Borboroglu is turning things around. Using an approach that combines science, management and education, he works to conserve penguins across the southern hemisphere. Over the past 29 years, his work has brought together more than 125 organisations and benefited 1.2 million penguins in six countries.
Photograph: 2018 Whitley Award

An Adélie penguin. Notable achievements include working with government to foster protection of more than 3.1m hectares of habitat, benefiting 20 penguin colonies.
Photograph: 2018 Whitley Award

A conservation biologist specializing in reptiles, Shahriar Caesar Rahman won the nature guardian award for his work to preserve Asia’s largest tortoise in a remote corner of Bangladesh. In 2011, Caesar began exploring the Chittagong Hills, one of the least explored but most bio-diverse areas on the planet. His team discovered the wild Asian giant tortoise, previously thought to be extinct, and a new species of forest turtle.
Photograph: Scott Trageser/2018 Whitley Award

Rahman has since set up an initiative to protect tortoise populations and their surrounding habitats.
Photograph: Scott Trageser/2018 Whitley Award

With his Whitley award, Rahman will work with indigenous Mro people to establish community conservation areas to safeguard forest habitat and curb hunting by training more ex-hunters as ‘parabiologists’ employed to monitor and protect wildlife.
Photograph: Scott Trageser/2018 Whitley Award

Kerstin Forsberg became involved in manta ray conservation in Peru, working with local fishers and volunteers to study and conserve the species.
Photograph: François Schaer/2018 Whitley Awards

Peru and Ecuador are thought to be home to the largest giant manta ray population in the world, but the last 75 years have seen localised populations decline by up to 80%. While a dead manta is worth up to $500, manta ray tourism can bring in $1m during the life of a single ray. For the first time in Peru, fishers are being supported by to develop responsible manta ecotourism. With new income streams from tourism, fishers are starting to release incidentally captured mantas with the knowledge that they are worth more alive.
Photograph: 2018 Whitley Awards

Forsberg’s NGO has already gained legal protection for giant manta rays in the Peru. Her Whitley award work will continue to tackle threats to mantas and reduce accidental bycatch of the species. Fishers will be given technical and financial support to benefit from ecotourism, 100 citizen scientists will be engaged with monitoring and education programmes scaled up.
Photograph: Martin Strmiska/Getty Images

Numbers of eastern lowland gorilla – also known as Grauer’s gorilla – are estimated to have fallen by 77% over the last 20 years and the animal faces extinction by the mid-21st century without determined efforts to conserve habitats. Bikaba’s landmark achievements include getting communities to agree to commit 3,000sq km of forest for gorilla conservation, but for wildlife to survive, people must have access to livelihoods and future development.
Photograph: 2018 Whitley Awards

 

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